Effects of playing computer games thesis

In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Brian A. Primack, a professor of medicine and pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, applauds the efforts to shine light on the apparently growing phenomenon of adult gamers, highlighting the statistic that the average age of video game enthusiasts is actually 35. He also laments the growing prevalence of “playlike activities”—that is, things that stimulate similar parts of the brain as old fashioned running around does, but with out all of the sweating and, you know, being outside. Yet he doesn’t pan gaming altogether, suggesting it may be beneficial in helping develop hand-eye coordination, and that games like Wii Fit , which simulate sports and actually get you moving may be better than just sitting around. But Primack does raise offer a word of caution: With video games now being developed for everything from pure entertainment to surgical training and street safety, he says, it may not be too long before the virtual world starts to eclipse the real one. “[W]ho will be left to remind us that—for children and adults alike—Hide-And-Seek and Freeze Tag are still probably what we need most?”

Effects of playing computer games thesis

effects of playing computer games thesis

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