Teaching compare contrast essay middle school

In the next section, you will be planning your own Compare & Contrast lesson. To prepare, you should do the following things before you move on:

  • Keep an eye out for students who use comparative thinking in your classroom. What steps do you notice them taking? How comfortable are they with comparison?
  • As you teach over the coming weeks, keep track of those times when you might have used Compare & Contrast. Take note of these instances, and be ready to share them as you proceed through the following sections.
  • Compile all the materials you'll need to plan a Compare & Contrast lesson (., content, standards to cover) and bring them to the next meeting with your learning club.

Teacher: I learned a lot about alligators and crocodiles from that passage. I noticed that the way the passage compared and contrasted alligators and crocodiles really helped me understand the ways that alligators and crocodiles are the same, and the ways that they are different. I also noticed that there were certain words and phrases that I saw as I was reading that let me know that this was a compare and contrast passage. Let's go back to the passage now and see if we can find any words or phrases that let us know that the passage is comparing and contrasting two types of animals. [Teacher and students read through the passage again, and create a list of compare-contrast words and phrases that includes both, similar, but, different, compare, and to tell apart.]

Teaching compare contrast essay middle school

teaching compare contrast essay middle school

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